Theology and Religious Studies (SQFHUMART)

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List of Subject-Specific Competences

1. A critical awareness of the historical, social, and cultural significance of religious traditions and of attitudes toward religions.
2. An awareness of the ways in which theological understanding or religious belief may influence and inform the ethics, outlook, and behaviour of individuals and communities.
3. A knowledge of the ways in which specific religions and religious institutions are structured and regulated.
4. The ability to read texts critically and accurately with a view to their original meaning, and their historical and contemporary application.
5. A sensibility to the problems of religious language and experience, and to issues of multiple and conflicting interpretations of language and symbols, texts and traditions.
6. A critical awareness of the interactions between religions and societies, both historically and in the contemporary world.
7. An appreciation of, and the capacity to apply in practice, an understanding of the complexity of different mentalities, social behaviours and aesthetic responses, and of the ways they have been shaped by beliefs and values, and conversely, how beliefs, sacred texts and art forms have been shaped by society and politics.
8. An appreciation of both the interconnectedness and internal tensions within a system of beliefs and practices, and of the theological significance of religious statements.
9. An ability to understand and evaluate new and developing forms of religious belief and practice.
10. An ability to apply theological knowledge in professional and social life, in accordance with human rights and European values.
11. To understand and, as appropriate, to participate in dialogue between religious traditions and belief systems.
12. An awareness of the roles of the theologian in different contexts and societies.
13. A knowledge of the history, and specifically the religious history, of relevant regions.
14. An ability to read and comprehend academic texts in relevant disciplines.
15. A critical awareness of the ongoing nature of theological research and debate.
16. An ability to communicate orally in ones own language using the terminology and techniques accepted in the profession.
17. An ability to communicate orally in other languages using the terminology and techniques accepted in the profession.
18. An ability to read historical texts or original documents in ones own language, to summarize, transcribe and catalogue information as appropriate.
19. An ability to read historical texts or original documents in other languages, to summarize, transcribe and catalogue information as appropriate.
20. An ability to write with clarity using appropriate styles of writing.
21. A knowledge and ability to use selectively information retrieval tools, such as bibliographical or other databases.
22. A knowledge and ability to use specific tools and relevant software to study sources.
23. An ability to use appropriate information technology and internet resources.
24. A knowledge of ancient languages.
25. An awareness of, and, as appropriate, an ability to employ tools from other relevant disciplines (e.g. literary theory and criticism, semiotics, art history, archaeology, anthropology, law, sociology, philosophy, economics, natural sciences, bioethics).
26. An awareness of methods and issues in different branches of theological and religious studies.
27. An ability to define research topics which can make a suitable contribution to knowledge and debate in the areas of theology and religious studies.
28. An ability to identify sources of information for research projects, and to use them appropriately.
29. An ability to communicate theological and religious concepts and contexts to a broader public.
30. A knowledge of the theory and practice of religious education.

Maria

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